Learning Disabilities

We specialise in supporting individuals who have learning disabilities and additional complex needs, including those with a dual diagnosis.

Sometimes referred to as a dual diagnosis of learning disability and mental health, or simply as a dual diagnosis, the risk of mental ill health is greater amongst people with learning disabilities than among the general population.

There are a number of physical, psychological and social factors that mean people with learning disabilities are at a greater risk of mental health problems. Historically, people with learning disabilities can be disadvantaged in socially important areas of life such as education and work and therefore often have a low status and little money. This, combined with often unsettled and uncertain lives can result in exposure to particularly high levels of stress, the experience of disruption, loss and separation which can contribute to mental ill health.

If not managed correctly, all of these factors can contribute to a sense of worthlessness and isolation; it is no surprise therefore that mental health problems such as anxiety and depression are common amongst those living with a learning disability.

Whether an individual has an acute mental illness or a chronic condition, Consensus works closely with local Primary Care Services and other agencies to support individuals on a daily basis to ensure the best possible treatment for dual diagnosis. Support staff receive specialist training to assist them to identify the signs of relapsing or deteriorating mental health conditions, enabling them to flag up impending crises at an earlier stage and access the highest level of dual diagnosis treatment.

Each person supported by Consensus is allocated a Key Worker. A Key Worker is responsible for working with you to help co-ordinate your transition and on-going support. This support is outlined in a Person Centred Plan that puts you at the centre of your support and helps you to make choices about different areas of your life, including:

  • Becoming more independent
  • Finding things to do that you enjoy
  • Making new friends and meet new people
  • Developing daily living skills
  • Finding a college, sports club or social and skills centre
  • Finding a job
  • Being part of your community
  • Being happy
  • Managing your money
  • Going on holiday
  • Being healthy

Your person centred plan is all about you. It helps us to know what was important to you in the past, what is important to you now and what will be important to you in the future. It will help us to support you to ‘get the life you want.’